@stoptpp
The TPP, short for Trans Pacific Partnership, is a Free Trade Agreement that is currently being pushed by the US to 10 nations of the Pacific Rim: New Zealand, Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, Peru, Singapore, Vietnam, Mexico and Canada. Japan has shown interest. The TPP just held it's 13th Round of Negotiations in the US, and will be holding Round 14th on September. The Trans-Pacific Partnership would create a super-treaty which would jeopardize the sovereignty of the nations involved by giving that power to large corporations like Wal-Mart, Monsanto, Goldman Sachs, Pfizer, Halliburton, Philip Morris, GE, GM, Apple.

  • The economic power of this group is more than 40% larger than the 27- nation European Union.
  • TPP will offshore millions of good-paying jobs to low-wage nations, undercutting working conditions globally and increasing unemployment.
  • TPP will expand pharmaceutical monopoly protections and institute longer patents that will decrease access to affordable medications
  • TPP will limit food GMO labeling and allow the import of goods that do not meet US safe standards.
  • TPP will institute SOPA, PIPA, and CISPA-like regulations and Internet measures which restrict our right to free speech.
  • TPP will roll back Wall Street regulations, and prohibit bans on risky financial services.
  • TPP will give multinational corporations and private investors the right to sue nations in private tribunals. These tribunals have the power to overturn environmental, labor, or any other laws that limit profit, awarding taxpayer funded damages.
  • TPP will encourage the privatization of lands and natural resources in areas where indigenous people live.
  • For more information check out this site ran by Occupy San Diego www.stoptpp.org

    http://www.stoptpp.org | osdnotpp@interoccupy.net

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    Dealing with the TNCs

    Posted May 1st, 2013 by osdnotpp • permalink

    Threatened by billion-dollar lawsuits arising from investment treaties, several governments have formed a new grouping to deal with transnational companies.

    LEADERS of several Latin American countries have set up a new coalition to coordinate actions to face the growing number of international legal suits being taken against governments by transnational companies.

    A ministerial meeting of 12 countries held in Guayaquil, Ecuador, decided on several joint actions to counter the threat posed by these lawsuits, which have claimed millions or even billions of dollars from governments.

    “No more should small countries face lawsuits from big companies by themselves,” said Ecuador Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino at a media conference after the meeting which he chaired.

    “We have now decided to deal with the challenges posed by these transnational companies in a coordinated way.”

    Seven of the countries, mostly represented by their ministers of foreign affairs, trade or finance, adopted a declaration with an agreement to form a conference of states affected by transnational interests.

    They are Ecuador, Bolivia, Cuba, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, St Vincent and the Grenadines as well as Venezuela.

    Representatives of another five countries (Argentina, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Mexico) also attended the meeting and will convey the results to their respective governments.

    The ministers decided to set up an executive committee, initially led by Ecuador to coordinate political and legal actions including sending information on legal disputes involving the states, coordinating joint legal actions and disseminating information to the public.

    They also agreed to establish a regional arbitration centre for settling investment disputes, based on fair and balanced rules when settling disputes between corporations and States.

    The proposed centre is to provide an alternative to existing international tribunals which are seen as biased in favour of investors’ interests.

    The tribunals, such as ICSID (based at the World Bank in Washington), have also been accused of being mired in conflict of interest situations.

    Only a few arbitrators hear a majority of cases, with many of them also appearing as lawyers for companies in other cases, and some being board members of transnational companies.

    The ministers also decided to create an “international observatory” to monitor and analyse investment cases, to reform the present arbitration system and suggest alternative mechanisms for fair mediation between states and transnational companies.

    The observatory would also promote coordination between the judicial systems of Latin American states, to ensure the enforcement of domestic judicial decisions on disputes between states and transnational corporations.

    It should also give advice to governments on their negotiations with transnational corporations, especially in trade and investment contracts.

    The meeting had been prompted by serious concerns arising from investment cases taken by transnational companies against the governments under bilateral investment treaties and free trade agreements that enable these companies to sue for loss of future profits due.

    For example, to new government regulations or a cancellation or amendment of a contract.

    There have been more than 500 known investor-to-state cases, 60 alone in 2012.

    Some countries in the region, such as Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela and Mexico each had 20 to 30 cases taken against them.

    The proliferation of cases in recent years has also affected developing countries in other regions, such as South Africa, India, Indonesia and Vietnam, as well as many developed countries.

    Disillusionment with the agreements and the arbitration system has prompted a variety of actions by governments such as the suspension of negotiations for new treaties, attempts to renegotiate or withdraw from existing treaties, and withdrawal from the jurisdiction of the ICSID tribunal.

    Ecuador Vice-President Jorge Glas Espinel briefed the meeting about two arbitration disputes taken against his government by oil companies under bilateral investment treaties (BITs), and on the tribunal judgments which in his view were unfair and even outrageous.

    In one of the cases, Ecuador was asked to pay US$2.3bil (RM6.98bil) compensation (including interest) to the American oil company Oxy even though the arbitrators recognised that the company had broken the terms of its contract with the government.

    Other ministers and officials also presented the experiences of their countries in cases taken against them by foreign investors, and proposed actions that could be taken to avoid future cases or reduce their effects.

    A background note explaining the reason for the meeting said that arbitration proceedings and claims by European and US multinational companies against a growing number of states of the South have dramatically in­­creased.

    These costly litigations, the majority of which were decided in favour of the investors, not only affect the states’ fiscal situation but pose a serious challenge to their national jurisdiction and sovereignty.

    The costly litigations also compromised on-going development plans in Latin America and other regions.

    This problem originated in the 1990s when bilateral investment treaties were signed by developing countries in the expectation of attracting foreign investments, but the negative consequences of such commitments have now become evident, said the note.

    A second meeting of the newly formed grouping will be held in Caracas in July.

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    Can a “Dracula Strategy” Bring Trans-Pacific Partnership into the Sunlight?

    Posted April 2nd, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    Can a “Dracula Strategy” Bring Trans-Pacific Partnership into the Sunlight?

    What would the TPP do?
    Eleven countries are now involved—Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, Vietnam, and the United States—and there is an open invitation for more to join. Think of the TPP as a NAFTA on steroids, which could encompass half of the world.

    Foreign firms could extract unlimited amounts of taxpayer money as compensation when investors claim that U.S. government actions undermine their expected future profits. Seriously.
    This is the largest, most potentially damaging agreement since the 1995 establishment of the WTO. And you may never have heard about it before. That’s because the negotiations, which have been underway for three years, are being conducted in extreme secrecy. The public, Congress, and the press are locked out, but the 600 official corporate advisors have access to the negotiating texts.

    The TPP is the latest strategy by the same gang who got us into the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and pushed for the expansion of the WTO: American job-offshorers like GE and Caterpillar; banksters like Citi; pharmaceutical price-gouging giants like Pfizer; oil, gas, and mining multinationals like Chevron and Exxon; and agribusiness monopolists like Cargill and Monsanto.

    They’ve misbranded the TPP as a model 21st-Century “trade” deal to try to sell it with the usual false promises of it expanding exports. But only two of the TPP’s 29 chapters are about “trade.”

    Most of the TPP’s proposed provisions instead comprise a corporate power grab. The TPP would include extreme protections for foreign investors, which would help corporations offshore American jobs to low-wage countries. These terms would require governments to provide foreign investors a guaranteed “minimum standard of treatment” when they relocate, including special privileges and rights that domestic firms and investors do not enjoy. Foreign firms—or foreign subsidiaries of U.S. firms—could extract unlimited amounts of taxpayer money as compensation when investors claim that U.S. government actions undermine a corporation’s expected future profits. Seriously.”

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    TPPx Border

    Posted April 2nd, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    Bringing the Movement Against Corporate Power Back to the Streets!
    The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) pretends to be a 21st Century Trade Deal. It purports to “open new markets and create new business opportunities” for all participating countries. But 30 years of neoliberal free trade is enough to show us these corporate rights pacts only benefit the elite and increase inequality. The TPP can only create new barriers to an alternative economic future where living well and protecting the earth are more important than corporate profits. It will undermine the ability of communities to collectively decide what is in their best interests.

    On May 11, just prior to a new TPP negotiating round in Peru, we call on the 99% who are harmed by corporate globalization to oppose the TPP in their community. There are many reasons for people to come together on this date:

    - The TPP undermines access to fundamental medicines by extending monopoly protections for Big Pharma

    - The TPP empowers corporations to sue governments for environmental and health measures they do not like

    - The TPP restricts Internet innovation and increases the surveillance of online interactions

    - The TPP undermines Indigenous rights and human rights

    - The TPP creates a race to the bottom on working conditions, environmental standards and all kinds of public regulations

    - The TPP prioritizes large-scale corporate agriculture (GMOs, antibiotics, etc) over sustainable local farming

    We can and must stand together against this latest corporate assault on democracy. On May 11, we can start to bring the anti-corporate globalization movement back to the streets. Hold community assemblies to discuss the problems with the TPP and the free trade model. Stage creative actions or stunts that draw attention to the TPP negotiations in Peru. Trans-national community resistance put a freeze on the WTO. It stopped the Free Trade Area of the Americas. It can stop the TPP.

    Activists should visit the website TPPxBorder.org for information about May 11th events already being developed, and to share information about events they are planning in their own communities.

    http://tppxborder.org/

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    TransPacific Partnership Threatens Sovereignty and Public Ownership

    Posted April 2nd, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

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    Trading Away Health: The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP)

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

     

    Unless damaging provisions are removed before negotiations are finalized, the TPP agreement is on track to become the most harmful trade pact ever for access to medicines in developing countries.

    The TPP trade deal is currently being negotiated between the U.S. and ten other Pacific Rim nations. The negotiations are being conducted in secret, but leaked drafts of the agreement include aggressive intellectual property (IP) rules that would restrict access to affordable, lifesaving medicines for millions of people.

    Proposed by U.S. negotiators, the IP rules enhance patent and data protections for pharmaceutical companies, dismantle public health safeguards enshrined in international law, and obstruct price-lowering generic competition for medicines.

    As a medical humanitarian organization working in nearly 70 countries, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is concerned about the impact these provisions will have on public health in developing countries where MSF works and beyond.

    Governments have a responsibility to ensure that public health interests are not trampled by commercial interests, and must resist pressures to erode hard-fought legal safeguards for public health that represent a lifeline for people in developing countries. MSF urges the U.S. government to withdraw—and all other TPP negotiating governments to reject—provisions that will harm access to medicines.

     

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    As Clock Ticks Toward Trans-Pacific Trade Pact Deadline, U.S. Must End Stall Tactics on Access to Medicines

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    Cambodia 2007 © Dieter Telemans

    A Cambodian HIV patient holds some of her drug regimen in an MSF HIV ward.

    NEW YORK, MARCH 4, 2013—As closed-door talks for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement resume in Singapore this week, international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) calls on the U.S. government to end its stall tactics and revise its proposals for what otherwise promises to be the most harmful trade deal ever for access to medicines in developing countries.

    The TPP negotiations, which currently involve eleven Asia-Pacific countries, are being conducted in secret, but leaked texts reveal the most aggressive intellectual property (IP) measures ever suggested in a trade deal with developing countries. The U.S. proposals threaten to roll back internationally-agreed public health safeguards and would put in place far-reaching monopoly protections that keep medicine prices high and out of the reach of millions in the Asia-Pacific region.

    “Too many people already die needlessly because the medicines they need are too expensive or do not exist, and we cannot stand by as the Trans-Pacific Partnership threatens to further restrict access to medicines in developing countries,” said Dr. Unni Karunakara, International President of MSF. “We are gravely concerned about countries like Thailand, where MSF started treating HIV/AIDS more than a decade ago and then transitioned its programs to local authorities with the confidence that they would be able to continue providing lifesaving treatments. Now Thailand is on the cusp of joining a dangerous deal that could jeopardize its ability to maintain, let alone scale up, vital, life-saving health programs for its people.”

    Read the MSF Issue Brief: Trading Away Health

    Furthermore, U.S. negotiators have said the TPP will be a template for its future trade agreements across the globe, setting a damaging precedent. Despite widespread opposition to its current proposals, including from other negotiating countries, the U.S. has failed to put forth any alternative text, essentially running out the clock so countries may be forced to accept its original demands in order to meet the announced October 2013 deadline.

    The proposed IP rules would grant the pharmaceutical industry a wide-ranging set of legal mechanisms designed to prolong monopoly protection for medicines and delay the availability of more affordable generic versions. These demands represent a complete repudiation of the U.S. government’s own 2007 bipartisan trade policy, which promised to scale back some of the harshest IP provisions in trade deals with developing countries.

    One proposed TPP provision would require governments to grant new 20-year patents for modifications of existing medicines, such as a new forms, uses or methods, even without improvement of therapeutic efficacy for patients. Another provision would make it more expensive and cumbersome to challenge undeserved or invalid patents; and yet another would add additional years to a patent term to compensate for administrative processes. Taken together, these and other provisions will add up to more years of high-priced medicines at the expense of people needing treatment waiting longer for access to affordable generics.

    Meanwhile, provisions in the proposed investment chapter would give pharmaceutical companies the right to sue governments for instituting any regulation that reduces their expected profits, using private tribunals that circumvent a country’s judicial process. U.S. pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly is using similar provisions in NAFTA to demand $100 million from the Canadian government for invalidating one of its patents, claiming, among other things, that the company’s expected profits were “expropriated” when the patent was overturned.

    “Despite paying lip service to the idea of balancing public health with trade interests, the U.S. government has yet to revise its demands for harmful provisions that will obstruct access to affordable generic medicines,” said Judit Rius Sanjuan, U.S. manager for MSF’s Access Campaign. “Countries negotiating the TPP must prevent harmful provisions from being shoe-horned into the final deal. The U.S. and its TPP partners must take their public health commitments seriously and agree to a trade agenda that promotes both innovation and access to medicines.”

     http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org/press/release.cfm?id=6663&cat=press-release&source=ads120000r01

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    Favorable signs for Doha talks

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    China to take a more proactive role in opening-up, minister says

    China is committed to pushing forward the Doha round of talks inresponse to what it sees as recent positive signs that may lead toprogress in the global trade talks around the end of this year, theminister of commerce said on Friday.

    China will hold talks toward bilateral investment agreements with morecountries and regions, especially the developed ones, to removerestrictions that Chinese companies have encountered, Chen Demingsaid at a news conference on the sidelines of the National People’sCongress’ annual session in Beijing.

    The Doha talks, started in 2001 to help the world’s poorest countries,have not been smooth.

    In 2011, Pascal Lamy, director-general of the World Trade Organization, declared an”impasse”.

    Reports said the countries concerned had reached consensus on a majority of issues, butsome nations, led by the United States, held divergent views on a few sensitive issues.

    “There have been some new signals about the Doha talks during the past two months, and allmember nations concerned are considering launching an early harvest program” by the end ofthis year, and “China is glad to see and advance the proposal”, Chen said.

    “Generally speaking, all the member nations are confident of the program,” Chen said.

    Although it has been blamed for being one of the few nations that brought the talks to astandstill, the US has been active in advancing regional trade pacts.

    The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, also known as the TPP, which covers 11 nations, isexpected to be concluded in 2013, and early this year the US and the European Unionannounced the start of talks on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, alsoknown as the TTIP.

    Both are reportedly in response to the growing economic power of China in Asia andworldwide.

    The US invited Japan to join the TPP, and Japan has also expressed its desire to do so, butChina is not included in the talks. “All the regional trade pacts should be transparent andinclusive to all,” Chen said.

    According to Chen, regional and bilateral trade pacts are encouraged under the framework ofthe WTO, but all WTO members, including the US and China, should put priority on the Dohatalks.

    Yi Xiaozhun, the Chinese ambassador to the WTO, said that the US is deviating from themultilateral trade system through putting great efforts into the regional trade pacts led by theTPP and TTIP.

    “We should strike some balance between the regional and multilateral trade talks. Anyway, theDoha round of talks is the most important of all,” Yi, also a member of the 12th NationalCommittee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference, said on the sidelines ofthe CPPCC session.

    China has signed free trade agreements with 15 nations, and negotiations are under way for13 other trade talks with nations including Japan, South Korea, Iceland and Switzerland,according to the ministry.

    The US was urged by some countries to go back to the table and to the negotiations, as theDoha round is “in crisis”.

    Chen said “China will take a more proactive role in opening up to the world” on a wide range ofissues, including service and trade, regional development, free trade, foreign investment andforeign trade.

    He especially pointed out China’s need to step up efforts to invest abroad, extending its reachto more developed economies on signing bilateral investment agreements.

    China has signed investment agreements with more than 100 countries and regions. Lastyear, China and the US agreed to resume bilateral investment agreement talks.

    http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2013-03/09/content_16293335.htm

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    What Is Wrong With the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    BY CAROLINA ROSSINI AND MAIRA SUTTON

    EFF has been fighting against the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) intellectual property chapter for several years. This agreement poses a great risk to users’ freedoms and access to information on a global scale.

    We have created this infographic to capture the most problematic aspects of TPP, and to help users, advocates and innovators from around the world spread the word about how this agreement will impact them and their societies. Right-click and save the image for the PNG file, or you can download the PDF version below.

    We thank Lumin Consulting for working with us on this project.

     

    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/08/whats-wrong-tpp

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    Trans-Pacific Partnership Draws Attention From K Street

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    TPP Logo.png

    By Janie Boschma

    While the 16th round of negotiations surrounding the 11-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership wraps up in Singapore this week, K Street has plenty to say about the trade alliance and its terms at home.

    One of Washington’s top lobbying firmsPodesta Group, recently launched a new cross-border lobbying arm, Global Solutions, to expand its reach abroad. Chairman Tony Podestasaid the new group will focus on influencing negotiations over two multilateral free trade agreements, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), and any other issues “at the intersection of trade, economics, politics and diplomacy.”

    A number of high-profile lobbying clients that have plenty at stake in free trade agreements, especially a new cross-Pacific Asian alliance that could counteract China’s trading power. The TPP, which many are calling the core of the Obama administration’s pivot to Asia, deals with a range of trade issues, though most of the corporate stakeholders are primarily concerned with intellectual property rights, according to 2012 lobbying reports.

    Through the end of 2012, 166 lobbying clients mentioned the TPP in their lobbying reports to the House and Senate since the partnership formed in 2010. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce seems to have the greatest interest in the partnership, mentioning it 42 times overall and at least 16 times in 2012 alone. The Chamber has focused particularly on protecting intellectual property rights in foreign trade, especially against online infringement and counterfeit goods.

    Tony PodestaGoogle, one of Podesta Group’s clients, has mentioned the TPP 17 times in its lobbying reports, about half of which were in 2012. Google has lobbied especially for online freedom of expression and protecting Google Maps, Google Earth and YouTube from counterfeiting abroad.

    The National Retail Federation, a member of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Apparel Coalition, could benefit from increased trade with developing partner countries. It has mentioned the TPP 26 times and at least 10 times in 2012, reporting that its emphasis is supporting trade rules in the agreement that would promote “supply chain management and efficiency.” Specifically, the NRF has pushed Congress to keep the “yarn-forward” restriction out of any TPP agreements. The yarn-forward rule requires retailers to use yarn and fabric from TPP countries to receive duty-free status, which the NRF says is too limiting because current TPP partners don’t have “significant yarn and fabric production.”

    The AFL-CIO has mentioned the TPP in its lobbying reports 21 times. The AFL-CIO is primarily concerned that the new pact will follow the same format as the North American Free Trade Agreement, which it says “promotes a race to the bottom,” in that it prioritizes cheap goods produced by low-wage jobs, without increasing wages, product safety or quality of life in either the United States or in partner countries.

    Former Mexican Ambassador to the U.S. Arturo Sarukhan is leaving his diplomatic post to take over Podesta’s new global lobbying arm as its chairman. As ambassador, Sarukhan was involved with NAFTA negotiations and helped Mexico join the TPP.

    Mexico and Canada joined as members last year, though China is not included in the partnership. The other nine members are the United States, Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. Japan has discussed joining the partnership with the United States and will likely make a decision this year, according to Reuters.

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    TPP: What you need to know about this ‘super-sized’ trade deal

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink
    Photo: GlobalExchange.org

    BY KRISTEN BEIFUS MANUEL PÉREZ-ROCHA RAUL BURBANO

     

    A 16th round of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations is underway in Singapore. Canada and Mexico join the nine other TPP countries for the second time since the U.S. government invited its NAFTA partners to join late last year.

    The TPP is a super-sized trade deal-expanding on so called “next generation” trade and investment deals that NAFTA countries have pursued in the wake of the stalemate at the World Trade Organization. This pluri-lateral agreement poses serious new threats to North American communities — threats that a tri-national movement of trade justice activists is preparing to fight in the lead-up to a possible July TPP negotiating round in Canada.

    Since NAFTA was signed almost 20 years ago, all three North American countries have seen good jobs vanish, worsening income inequality, public services weakened through underfunding or offloaded to the private sector, increased food insecurity (in particular in Mexico), and ecosystems on the point of breaking. NAFTA promised a flourishing North American economy that would benefit all. In Jan. 2014, NAFTA has been in place for 20 years and the promised trickle down benefits have not been realized by communities.

    NAFTA’s dismal results  

    In the past 10 years, Canada has lost 500,000 manufacturing jobs. A new United Way Toronto report found that in and around Toronto, Canada’s largest city, 20 per cent of people are now employed in precarious, unstable or part-time jobs. This type of employment has increased by 50 per cent in the past 20 years since NAFTA was signed. In this same period, not a single notable social program has been introduced or expanded. Free trade has permanently eroded our sense of what people can do together for the common good.

    Canada is also facing over $2.5-billion worth of legal suites by corporations that are permitted to sue countries under NAFTA for potential profits if blocked by health and safety or environmental laws from conducting business as usual. Current suits include a U.S. corporation challenging a moratorium on natural gas fracking in Quebec, a court decision to annul a patent by Eli Lilly, a decision against opening a new gravel quarry in Ontario because of the likely effect on water and farmland, and many others “coming down the pipeline.”

    In Mexico millions of small farmers were displaced when NAFTA came into force in 1994 creating a massive push for migration to the United States. But NAFTA hit Mexico very hard again during the 2008-2009 financial crisis given Mexico’s dependency on the United States. In fact, Felipe Calderon’s presidency has been characterized by the slowest growth since 1954, a mere 1.58 per cent in average from 2007 to 2011, and, according to World Bank indicators, between 2007 and 2010, GDP per capita in Mexico decreased by 3.71 per cent, which is among the worst performance in Latin America.

    The United States, which is leading the TPP charge, has also suffered under NAFTA. The AFL-CIO in February challenged the benefit the TPP offers to workers, citing that the U.S. trade deficit “has increased dramatically under NAFTA — from $75 billion in 1993, to $540 billion today (in nominal terms).” Since the implementation of NAFTA, says the AFL-CIO, “the growth in the trade deficit with Mexico has cost the United States nearly 700,000 net jobs.” The AFL-CIO is calling for a Global New Deal that promotes growth “with equity, protect their health and safety and foster sustainable development.”

    ‘Trade’ deals are designed to take away alternative economic strategies

    Next generation corporate trade deals like the TPP and the proposed “comprehensive” pacts that Canada, the U.S. and Mexico are pursuing with the European Union, purposely take away our ability to pursue alternative economic strategies. These deals are designed to ensure that governments have no power in the economy, and that they are only useful when they are using tax payer dollars to bail out large banks and other corporations.

    Like NAFTA, the TPP will handcuff our ability to set regulations in key areas like finance, industry, the environment, public procurement and fostering programs to create jobs at home. Free trade offers corporate subsidies for the rich and cut-throat competition for everyone else. So it should come as no surprise that communities across the continent and the Western Hemisphere are mobilizing in what can be expected as the battle against the TPP.

    On Dec. 1, hundreds of labour, community, public health and internet freedom advocates from Canada, the U.S and Mexico descended on the Peace Arch Park in Surrey, B.C., between Washington State and British Columbia. The Tri-National Unity Statement that came out of that strategic gathering has been signed by hundreds of organizations representing tens of thousands of people across the continent.

    Since our Dec. 1 cross-border action, community and NGO organizations from central and Latin America are raising their collective voices in opposition to the TPP. This opposition was solidified at the People’s Summit in Santiago de Chile — parallel to summit EU-CELAC Summit — this past January where civil society gathered to express and share their concerns and develop strategies to stop it. They are calling out the TPP as a ‘tool of disintegration’ in the region because it attempts to destabilize regional processes of integration that challenge the neoliberal model inherent in the TPP.

    These alternatives include the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR) and The Community of Caribbean and Latin American States (CELAC), as well as economic blocs like MERCOSUR and ALBA trading regions. The TPP is seen in Latin America as a second attempt by the United States to push a Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) in the region with help from countries whose governments are subservient to de the U.S. led neoliberal ideology and “free trade” economics.

    Stopping our governments from doing any more damage with corporate rights pacts like the TPP needs to be a priority of the peoples of North America. We must demand an alternative, more equitable and sustainable global trade regime. Trade and investment deals must respect and promote fundamental environmental rights, indigenous sovereignty, labour rights, including equal rights for migrant workers and people of color.

    Communities and local governments need to be able to actively create high-wage, high-benefit jobs in ways that do not undermine the well-being of our sisters and brothers globally.

    Governments must be able to promote democratic public policies in the public interest without fear of catastrophic lawsuits in non-democratic and non-transparent investment tribunals.

    Free trade creates rich people not rich communities. We have 20 years of evidence from NAFTA — we don’t want any more. Stop the TPP!

    Visit this website to sign the tri-national statement of unity against the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and to sign-up to be more involved. 
    Raul Burbano is the program director of Common Frontiers (Canada). Kristen Beifus is the executive director of the Washington Fair Trade Coalition and Manuel Pérez-Rocha is a member of the Mexican Action Network on Free Trade (RMALC) and an associate fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS).

    This article was originally published at TheTyee.ca and is reprinted here with permission. 

     

    http://rabble.ca/news/2013/03/tpp-what-you-need-know-about-super-sized-trade-deal

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    Japan expected to announce entry to TPP free-trade talks this week

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    TOKYO/SINGAPORE – Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is expected to declare Japan’s participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership free-trade negotiations at a news conference Friday.

    A government source on Tuesday confirmed this is the day being considered for the announcement. Abe is thought to be hoping to present his plan, and gain backing for it, at a general assembly of his ruling Liberal Democratic Party on Sunday.

    Meanwhile, some of the countries already engaged in TPP discussions in Singapore have aired concern over Japan’s search for an exemption to scrap all tariffs for certain items, such as farm produce, after it joins the talks, a source close to the negotiations said Tuesday.

    The LDP panel on the TPP is scheduled Wednesday night to draw up a set of demands for joining the trade talks, such as measures to protect the politically sensitive agricultural sector.

    Some LDP lawmakers have expressed concern about, and opposition to, Japan taking part because of the potentially adverse impacts on domestic industries and the livelihood of citizens. If the discussions get too heated at the LDP panel, the date of announcement may be delayed.

    After announcing Japan’s participation, the government will likely take steps to start the negotiations, including endorsements from the United States, Australia and New Zealand. Eleven countries are involved in the regional trade iniative.

    Japan will unlikely enter into negotiations before June because the United States requires at least 90 days to secure congressional approval even if the administration endorses Japan’s participation.

    In Singapore, meanwhile, the participating countries shared the view that they should request that Japan strictly adhere to what has already been agreed upon in previous rounds of negotiations, according to the source close to the negotiations.

    The source said Japan’s participation was formally discussed at the meeting and certain countries expressed concern that Tokyo has sounded out to some of the 11 TPP member nations over exempting rice and other items from tariff elimination. The source said views were expressed at the meeting that Japan should enter into talks without setting preconditions.

    In principle, the TPP calls for the elimination of all tariffs on all trade items. In December’s general election, the LDP pledged to oppose taking part in the negotiations unless exemptions to tariff eliminations are granted.

    In his talks with U.S. President Barack Obama in February, Abe confirmed that joining the free trade talks will not require a commitment to removing all tariffs.

    The 11 TPP countries are Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam.

    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/03/13/national/japan-expected-to-announce-entry-to-tpp-free-trade-talks-this-week/#.UUI_EluY5vZ

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    Who benefits from Trans-Pacific Partnership?

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    A new free trade agreement that will eventually cover over 40% of global trade is being hailed as one of the most ambitious plans in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Eleven Asian nations have signed up to take part in what is called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

    But what do participants and non-participants of the TPP want from the deal?

    Michelle Fleury gives the view from the US, which is leading negotiations, and Lucy Williamson reports from South Korea, which has so far resisted getting involved.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-21766273

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    (Yonhap Interview) deputy USTR

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink
    by Kang Eui-young, Lee Chi-dong

    WASHINGTON, March 12 (Yonhap) — The United States is cautiously optimistic thatSouth Korea will decide to join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, as it is a “natural candidate” for the ongoing talks, according to a top American trade official.

    “Given the high standards in our KORUS agreement, we believe (South) Korea would be a natural candidate for participation in TPP,” Deputy U.S. Trade Representative Demetrios Marantis said in a written interview Tuesday with Yonhap News Agency.

    He was referring to a free trade agreement (FTA) between the two nations, which went into effect a year ago. The landmark pact is called KORUS FTA.

    Marantis, however, stressed that it’s entirely Seoul’s call to make a decision. Seoul has taken a wait-and-see approach toward the TPP, which is another big trade deal and comes on the heels of tumultuous ratification procedures for the KORUS FTA.

    “With regard to the potential for additional entrants into the TPP, it is up to each country to determine its interest in joining and readiness to pursue a high-standard agreement and address outstanding concerns,” said Marantis.

    The TPP talks are a top trade agenda of the Obama administration in 2013.

    It aims to complete the negotiations by the end of this year. Currently, 10 nations — Australia, Peru, Malaysia, Vietnam, New Zealand,Chile, Singapore, Canada, Mexico and Brunei Darussalam – have joined.

    “We will work with our Asian partners on TPP, in various regional forums, and bilaterally to achieve market-opening, rules-based outcomes that benefit our individual economies, the region and the global trading system,” the official said with regard to Washington’s priority in the trade field.

    In a move expected to give a boost to the initiative, Japan also plans to announce a decision later this week to take part in the talks, according to local news reports.

    It is unclear if Tokyo’s move will affect Seoul’s consideration.

    The U.S., spearheading the TPP talks, is confident that the multilateral deal, if forged, will bring benefits to all participating nations.

    “We believe strongly that a high-standards approach is the best way to generate new trade growth and jobs,” Marantis said. “And we think the continued expansion of TPP demonstrates that these high standards have significant appeal within the region.”

    On the implementation of the KORUS FTA, which marks the first anniversary this week, he emphasized that it was a “win-win” agreement.

    He dismissed criticism at home that the U.S. has suffered from the pact.

    “The data from 2012 actually tell a good story for the United States,” he said, citing exports of manufactured goods to South Korea increased slightly.

    “Our exports to Korea also did quite well when one considers that Korea was experiencing much lower-than-expected economic growth in 2012, which depressed overall demand for imports,” he said. “We believe the agreement actually boosted U.S. exports to Korea in this otherwise challenging situation.”

    Still, he acknowledged that something can be done for small and medium-sized U.S. firms to gain more benefits.

    His office requested the International Trade Commission submit a detailed report on the KORUS FTA’s impact on smaller firms by May.

    Marantis left the door open for future consultations with South Korea aimed at opening the country’s beef market wider.

    “There is a consultation provision under our bilateral beef import protocol,” he said. “With respect to consultations under that protocol, we plan to request consultations at an appropriate time.”

    South Korea currently imports U.S. beef produced from cattle only under 30 months of age due to an earlier scare over mad cow disease.

    Beef trade with the U.S. is politically and emotionally charged in South Korea. A 2008 decision by the outgoing Lee Myung-bak government to resume imports of American beef sparked months of massive street protests.

    All rights reserved by Yonhap News Agency

    http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/taxonomy/term/39093/130312/yonhap-interview-deputy-ustr

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    TPP v. ASEAN: The Pivot And The Island Rows

    Posted March 14th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink

    “… 
    competing to lead the regional trade liberalization agenda.”

    by Arnie Saiki
    Los Angeles, California

    Editor: This analysis of the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement) and ASEAN(Association of Southeast Asian Nations) was written just before the 21st ASEAN Summit held in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on 18th November 2012. It is still relevant. 

    Links to footnotes open in a second browser for easy reference.

    When Obama heads to Cambodia to attend the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit, [i] he will be arriving with the full weight of his Pacific Pivot behind him.  He will be asserting policy that will ensure US strategic and economic relevance in the Asia-Pacific region. Obama, however will not be alone. Since the 2004 APEC meeting in Santiago, when Chilean President Ricardo Lagos, endorsed the creation of a Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific (FTAAP), [ii] both the U.S. and China — the world’s largest economies — have been competing to lead the regional trade liberalization agenda.

     

    In an attempt to meet the 1994 declaration of the APEC Bogor Goals, [iii] many have come to see the current implementation of an FTAAP in pursuing a trade and investment framework as concluding the failure of the decade-long WTO Doha Rounds. [iv] While the Doha Rounds were seen as important to sustaining the economic growth of the dominant economic powers, it also become increasingly irrelevant to emerging markets whose economies were quickly outpacing the U.S. and E.U. As the current economic agenda for both the U.S. and China will be to win over emerging markets and small economies, this article seeks to highlight the investment and trade agenda embedded in the Pacific Pivot and to prioritize the ecological and health priorities of smaller economies in the Pacific region.

    We are nearly a year into Obama’s announcement of a Pacific Pivot, a policy shift whereby the administration has moved 60% of military resources into the Pacific region.[v] Much of the discussion in the U.S. analyzing this pivot aims to focus on potential future conflict with China, while from the Chinese perspective, this viewpoint is seen as misguided. Luo Yuan, a retired major general and Executive Vice President of the China Strategic Culture Promotion Association asks, “Chinese people are very confused about U.S. activities. On what basis has the U.S. returned to Asia Pacific? Does the security situation of the region pose a threat to the United States? And are there any Asia-Pacific countries making the U.S. feel the necessity of sending more troops to the region?” [vi]

    At the Shangri-La Security dialogue this year, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta rejected the view that increased emphasis by the U.S. on the Asia-Pacific region was some kind of challenge to China. [vii]However, as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton just announced last week in Australia, “From the Indian Ocean to the Pacific Islands, American and Australian navies protect the sea lanes through which much of the world’s trade passes … our growing trade across the region, including our work together to finalize the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), binds our countries together, increases stability, and promotes security.” In reference to approving the new U.S.-Australian Defense Trade Cooperation Treaty, Clinton adds, “This agreement will boost trade, help our companies collaborate more closely, and spur innovation. It’s a definite win-win.” [viii]

    As we begin to consider the heightened line of new and/or renewed disputes with China over islands and sea-lanes between Vietnam, the Philippines, Taiwan, Malaysia, Brunei–and now Japan over the recent conflict over Senkaku/Daiogyu island, [ix] it would appear that the U.S. is focusing its military security on these disputed regions and sea-lanes, of which China’s shipping depends. [x]  Currently, the U.S. has no international legal standing to assert a policing presence in these disputed territories, so they are working on a series of bilateral cooperation agreements throughout the region, which includes the U.S./South Korea agreement to build a military port on a UNESCO World Heritage site and Biosphere Reserve on Jeju island. [xi]

    Complicating matters further, the U.S. is also expected to ratify the U.N. Convention of the Law of the Sea, which will provide the U.S. with the legal framework to take on regional military action in these disputed waters.[xii] At the November 2011 East Asia Summit on the issue of the South China Sea, the US declared that much of which China claims, is under the jurisdiction of international maritime law and any disputes over the area must be resolved through multi-national cooperation and dialogue. China, in contrast, declared that any disputes over possession of the South China Sea should be resolved bilaterally, rather than multinational forums or talks. [xiii] At the current meeting in Cambodia, leaders agreed not to internationalize the maritime disputes, which sets back any attempt to heighten the South China Sea rows, [xiv] and they would continue to draft a legally binding Code of Conduct document. [xv]

    Prime Minister Noda’s long held attempt to move Japan closer to joining the TPP, inflated the conflict with China and should not be underestimated. In addition to the Senkaku/Daiogyu dispute, Japan and South Korea have also resumed tensions over the disputed Dokdo/Takeshima Islands, further postponing the possibility of concluding an ASEAN+3 (which includes China, Japan and South Korea). The geopolitical manufacturing of this island row should be considered as sabotaging this year’s ASEAN round, [xvi] and while the TPP has been unpopular with the Japanese people, it is possible that any heightened military escalation in the region over these islands could generate public support for both the U.S. military expansion and the TPP.

    Upon closer examination, these territorial disputes with China have been taking place among a region that — using a Vietnamese proverb — understands that “the sun is good for cucumbers and the rain is good for rice.”  Countries participating in the TPP (or as with the Philippines and Taiwan who are negotiating bilateral Trade and Investment Framework Agreements (TIFAs) with the U.S.) are also the same countries committed to the ASEAN regional alignment that could also derail the TPP. In order for the U.S. to insert itself in the region, it needs allies that will wedge the ASEAN+ door open long enough for the U.S to embed those US-led North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)-style, trade and investment rules that can enforcibly bind the U.S. to the region. [xvii]

    What this means for the U.S. is that should ASEAN +3 conclude, the U.S. is less likely to lead the rules for investment and trade. A Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) among the ASEAN countries and its economic partners will immediately amount to an economic cooperation whose combined GDP (nominal) will be around US$16.2 trillion dollars. If ASEAN +6 (Australia, New Zealand, India) concludes that will amount to roughly a $19.7tn partnership. For reference, the GDP for the EU is around $17.6tn and the US is around $15tn. If the TPP, in its anticipated 13-country alignment (which may soon include Japan and Thailand), is concluded that will amount to a $26.7tn alignment. [xviii]

    For both China and the U.S, leading regional investment and trade does not mean that it will exclude each others economies, as it is likely to become even more integrated and globalized in the future. The competition will determine who will gain the most influence in determining the rules of investment and trade in the region, and who will have the greatest access to resources in developing resource-rich regions like the Pacific [xix] or Africa, [xx] where China is currently dominating.

    An ASEAN alignment will also likely embrace BRICS, while the TPP will continue with the dollar’s continued hegemony as the international trade currency. By conducting transactions independent of the dollar as the trade currency, it will reduce transaction costs and lower the risks involved in settlements at financial institutions. Developing countries seem to prefer the BRICS state-owned investment process rather than the structured loans of financial institutions that can often lead to institutionalizing punishing deregulations.

    Since the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) are trading off their integrated basket of currencies, it is primarily the U.S. financial system that will be negatively impacted. [xxi] Even Japan is participating in an agreement where it is trading with China on its own currency. [xxii]

    Despite the proliferation of an alphabet soup of regional economic integrations, both ASEAN +3/6 and the Trans-Pacific Partnership have been the dominant regional agreements working to conclude this year or next.  This geo-political football being played out for Asian and Pacific markets and resources are being competed for primarily between the US and China, and this competition impacts not only rules for investment and trade, but also human rights, militarization, access to sea-lanes, resource extraction, fisheries, migrant labor, currency and financial rules, among others.

    Pacific Plan

    Whether ASEAN’s $16.2/19.7tn or the TPP’s $26.7tn alignment, both formations lead to the creation of a Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific (FTAAP) that threaten the ecological bio-diversity and resource-rich Pacific Island nations whose economies are so small (on average, about $450 million) that individually, they will be unable to withstand the economic pressure coming from the investment regime. The ecological consequence of an expanded and hyper-globalized supply chain of this magnitude will be disastrous in an area — the third of the world’s surface — that is already confronting challenges to rising waters resulting from climate change, radiation poisoning, depletion of fisheries and reefs, and extreme degradation resulting from industrial extractive technologies. The human and ecological costs have already impacted Pacific Island Countries (PICs) and heightened economic hegemony will likely be disastrous.

    In 2010, the US announced closer cooperation with the Pacific Plan, [xxiii] an agenda drafted in 2005 by the Pacific Island Forum (PIF), a 16 member-state inter-governmental agency representing Pacific Island countries (PICs).  The Pacific Plan is described as “the master strategy for regional integration and coordination” in the Pacific. [xxiv]  One of the dominant threads of the Pacific Plan aims for political and economic integration among PICs and the creation for more investments in the Pacific in line with liberalizing regulations and trade.  The Pacific Plan has been criticized by Pacific Island activists for not representing the needs of its people and for being too influenced by the larger neo-liberal economic agenda of Australia and New Zealand.

    In line with this agenda, one of the objectives for the U.S. has been to support public-private partnerships with not only businesses but also sub-regional institutions and other civil society organizations that the U.S. has identified as being good partners. Starting before the APEC meeting in Hawaii in 2011, there has been a steady build-up of military systems in the Pacific and this includes the kind of infrastructure and security services in the region that essentially paves a super highway for Wall St. to drive new regional investment.

    New organizations like the Pacific Resource Infrastructure Facility (PRIF), relying upon institutions like the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, are helping to pave new investment opportunities in the region. [xxv]  Investment agreements have already been signed with PICs and leases have been rewarded for the development of renewable energy projects, agriculture, fisheries, biotech, as well as resource extractive industries and tourism.  As the Pacific superhighway is being paved for new investment traffic, the military is there to ensure that investments in the region are safe not only from the damaging effects of extreme weather resulting from climate change, or to provide infrastructure development services like the razing of reefs for ports, or the protection of shipping lanes, but this Pacific Pivot also nurtures regional instability aimed at curbing China’s regional dominance.

    Published in In Motion Magazine December 11, 2012

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    Pop-Up Puppet Theatre presents TPP v.1.5

    Posted March 13th, 2013 by stopptpp • permalink



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    Letter to Congress on the TPP and Fast Track

    Posted February 13th, 2013 by CTC • permalink

    BACKGROUND The President just touted the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Free Trade Agreement in his State of the Union address, and the Chamber of Commerce and others are now pushing legislation…

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    Two Dozen US Senators Demand Labor Rights in the TPP

    Posted December 3rd, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    Senator Al Franken (D-MN) and Olympia Snowe (R-ME) were the leads on a letter signed by two dozen U.S. Senators urging that President Obama prioritize workers’ rights and job creation…

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    Cross-Border Organizing Against the TPP

    Posted December 2nd, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    Hundreds of activists from throughout the Pacific Northwest and beyond gathered for a Cross-Border Rally and Organizing Summit to Defeat the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) held at Peace Arch Park on…

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    Leesburg: No Back Room Deals for the 1%

    Posted September 9th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    As the 14th major round of closed-door negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership took place in northern Virginia, Citizens Trade Campaign and our labor, environmental, consumer, public health, family farm and other social…

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    Respond to Comments in Real Time

    Posted September 8th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    Negotiators can use this form to respond to public comments about the TPP in real time.  Your responses will enter the livestream projected here and over the Internet. Please identify…

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    Share Your Comments with TPP Negotiators in Virginia

    Posted September 5th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    Submit your brief comments to Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiators using this handy new form, developed by the good folks at OpenMedia.ca, and CTC will then project them inside the resort…

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    Join Occupy the TPP Direct Action Training, Saturday 9/8

    Posted September 4th, 2012 by andrea • permalink

    There are a few slots left for the Occupy the TPP: Stop the Global Corporate Coup Direct Action training on Sat. September 8 at the Real News Network Building 235 Holliday St. Baltimore, MD. The training session will be led by top national trainers, Bill Moyer of the Backbone Campaign and Kim Marks of Rising Tide North America and Earth First!

    We will rehearse for actions to take place at the TPP negotiations in Leesburg, VA on Monday September 10 and Tuesday September 11. Actions may include banner drops, using weather balloons for banners, night-time light projection, tripods and more.

    The training goes from 9 am to 6 pm on Saturday, Sept. 8. Lunch provided. On Sun morning we will finish up anything that is needed and then will head to Leesburg for a rally at 3 pm. We are working on having a bus to and from Leesburg. There is no charge for the training but we do ask that you commit to an action.

    For more information, visit http://itsoureconomy.us/occupy-the-tpp-stop-the-global-corporate-coup/ or contact itsoureconomy.us@gmail.com.

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    TPP Creates Legal Incentives For ISPs To Police The Internet. What Is At Risk? Your Rights.

    Posted August 27th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink
    The draft chapter of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement on Intellectual Property—as of its current leaked version [PDF], article 16—insists that signatories provide legal incentives for Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to privately enforce copyright protection rules. The TPP wants service providers to undertake the financial and administrative burdens of becoming copyright cops, serving a copyright maximalist agenda while disregarding the consequences for Internet freedom and innovation.TPP article 16.3 mandates a system of ISP liability that goes beyond the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) standards and US case law. In sum, the TPP pushes a framework beyondACTA[1] and possibly the spirit of the DMCA, since it opens the doors for:

    • Three-strikes policies and laws that require Internet intermediaries to terminate their users’ Internet access on repeat allegations of copyright infringement
    • Requirements for Internet intermediaries to filter all Internet communications for potentially copyright-infringing material
    • ISP obligations to block access to websites that allegedly infringe or facilitate copyright infringement
    • Efforts to force intermediaries to disclose the identities of their customers to IP rightsholders on an allegation of copyright infringement.

    The TPP Puts Your Rights at Risk

    Service providers are the conduits of free expression. By enabling free or low-cost platforms that enable anyone to reach an audience of millions, ISPs have democratized media and enabled innovative ideas to spread quickly—without the gatekeepers of traditional media.

    Private ISP enforcement of copyright poses a serious threat to free speech on the Internet, because it makes offering open platforms for user-generated content economically untenable. For example, on an ad-supported site, the costs of reviewing each post will generally exceed the pennies of revenue one might get from ads. Even obvious fair uses could become too risky to host, leading to an Internet with only cautious and conservative content.

    Moreover, the TPP insists upon notice and takedown regimes at the price of a free and open Internet. Expression is often time-sensitive: reacting to recent news or promoting a candidate for election. Online takedown requirements open the door to abuse, allowing the claim of copyright to trump the judicial system, and get immediate removal, before the merits are assessed. Put back procedures can mitigate the harm, but even a few days of downtime can strike a serious blow to freedom of expression.

    A Sinister Side-Letter to Require Strict Takedown Procedures

    If the copyright maximalists have their way, the TPP will include a “side-letter,” an agreement annexed to the TPP to bind the countries to strict procedures enabling copyright owners to insist material are removed from the Internet. This strict notice-and-takedown regime is not new—in 2004, Chile rejected the same proposal in its bilateral trade agreement with the United States. Without the shackles of the proposed requirements, Chile then implemented a much more balanced takedown procedure in its 2010 Copyright Law, which provides greater protection to Internet users’ expression and privacy than the DMCA’s copyright safe harbor regime.

    Instead of ensuring due process and judicial involvement in takedowns, the TPP proposal encourages the spread of models that have been proven inefficient and have chilling unintended consequences, such as the US DMCA or the HADOPI Law in France.

    These strict rules are not only bad public policy, but have the potential to impinge on national sovereignty by imposing, through a non-transparent process, significant changes in existing national law, such as the Chile judicial takedown system or the Canadian system where ISPs provide a conduit for notices, but not extra-judicial takedowns. Where a country has implemented a system more balanced than the DMCA, the TPP should not overrule popular legislative process or bring a one-size fits all approach for substantive and procedural rules.

    TPP’s Safe Guards Are Not Safe

    By introducing a series of ISP liability safeguards, the TPP may promote the actual extension of ISPs’ secondary liability, something the entertainment and publishing industries dearly want. In a 2011 testimonial on whether Malaysia should join the TPP, the International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA) made clear that approach [PDF], seeking to bring new intermediary liability along with a strictly limited safe harbor.

    Intermediary liability is not universally recognized. The Office of the US Trade Representative—the agency leading the TPP negotiations—has recognized that creating limitations on liability encourages countries to adopt intermediary liability in the first instance. Indeed, if countries want to get off of the US intellectual property blacklist (the Special 301 report: a review of other countries’ intellectual property laws and enforcement standards), the USTR suggests that adopting the TPP can solve their problems. From the 11 negotiating TPP Countries, 5 are in the 301-2012 list [PDF] (Chile, Brunei, Peru, Mexico, Vietnam).

    The UN and the European Court of Justice Agree that Human Rights Are at Stake

    We’re not the only ones who see this as a threat to Internet freedom. Both the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression[2] and the European Court of Justice agree. In addition, Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights should still be the guiding light for TPP. It declares:

    “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.”

    To allow people to hold opinions without interference, and to seek, receive and impart information, it is critical to have a policy infrastructure that does not impose liability on Internet intermediaries. By forcing intermediaries to become much more than service providers, many of these proposals attempt to make Internet intermediaries the sole arbiter and enforcer of the law instead of courts and judges. ISPs are not well equipped to make these decisions, and these proposals lack the due process rights that are so critical in the courtroom.

    To the extent that governments wish to deputize Internet Intermediaries to enforce public policy objectives, the intermediaries must abide by the due process standards that apply to governments. At a minimum, this includes transparency, accountability, accuracy, precisely targeted measures that don’t cause collateral damage, a timely and affordable means of redress, and fairness and proportionality of cost distribution. The most appropriate role for Internet intermediaries is limited to forwarding notices of alleged infringement to their customers, and then allowing the judicial system to determine the subsequent steps. This includes protecting the identity of the user.

    Through the support of people like you, we’ve beaten back SOPA, PIPA and ACTA. We can do the same to the TPP, by shining a light on the copyright maximalists agenda, by explaining the implications of these back room deals, and—with your support—we can prevent the slow erosion of liberty on the Internet.

     

    [1] For a detailed comparison between TPP and ACTA see http://infojustice.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/table-03222012.pdf

    [2] Report to the UN General Assembly Human Rights Council, United Nations Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Opinion and Expression, June 2011. Available athttp://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrcouncil/docs/17session/A.HRC.17.27_en.pdf

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    LEAKED! TPP: the Son of ACTA will oblige America and other countries to throw out privacy, free speech and due process for easier copyright enforcement

    Posted August 27th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    By  on BoingBoing at 6:00 pm Saturday, Aug 25


    The Trans-Pacific Partnership is the son of ACTA, a secretive copyright and trade treaty being negotiated by the Pacific Rim nations, including the USA and Canada. As with ACTA, the secretive negotiation process means that the treaty’s provisions represent an extremist corporate agenda where due process, privacy and free expression are tossed out the window in favor of streamlined copyright enforcement. If this passes, America will have a trade obligation to implement all the worst stuff in SOPA, and then some. The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Carolina Rossini and Kurt Opsahl explain:

    TPP article 16.3 mandates a system of ISP liability that goes beyond DMCA standards and U.S. case law. In sum, the TPP pushes a framework beyond ACTA[1] and possibly the spirit of the DMCA, since it opens the doors for:

    * Three-strikes policies and laws that require Internet intermediaries to terminate their users’ Internet access on repeat allegations of copyright infringement

    * Requirements for Internet intermediaries to filter all Internet communications for potentially copyright-infringing material

    * ISP obligations to block access to websites that allegedly infringe or facilitate copyright infringement

    * Efforts to force intermediaries to disclose the identities of their customers to IP rightsholders on an allegation of copyright infringement.

    Incredibly, it gets worse:

    If the copyright maximalists have their way, the TPP will include a “side-letter,” an agreement annexed to the TPP to bind the countries to strict procedures enabling copyright owners to insist material are removed from the Internet. This strict notice-and-takedown regime is not new—in 2004, Chile rejected the same proposal in its bi-lateral trade agreement with the United States. Without the shackles of the proposed requirements, Chile then implemented a much more balanced takedown procedure in its 2010 Copyright Law, which provides greater protection to Internet users’ expression and privacy than the U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA)’s copyright safe harbor regime.

    Instead of ensuring due process and judicial involvement in takedowns, the TPP proposal encourages the spread of models that have been proven inefficient and have chilling unintended consequences, such as the HADOPI Law in France or the DMCA.

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    Direct Action Training for Occupy the TPP: Stop the Global Corporate Coup

    Posted August 22nd, 2012 by andrea • permalink

    Direct Action Training for Occupy the TPP: Stop the Global Corporate Coup

    Sat. Sept. 8 from 9 am until evening
    Sun. Sept. 9 in the morning – we will prepare and practice for a variety of actions at the TPP negotiations in Leesburg, VA

    Trainers: Bill Moyer of the Backbone Campaign and Kim Marks of Earth First!

    Learn how to manage large banners and get greatest visibility, shine a spotlight on the looting class, form tripods and more!

    The training is free but we do ask that you commit to one or more actions on Sept 9, 10 and/or 11.

    Registration closes at 50 people and we only have 25 spots left.

    Location: 235 Holliday St Baltimore, MD

    For more information, contact info@october2011.org and see http://itsoureconomy.us/occupy-the-tpp-stop-the-global-corporate-coup/

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    Film and Panel Discussion: “MAQUILAPOLIS” and Fair Trade Initiatives

    Posted August 21st, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    ImageAs a continued effort against Free Trade Agreements, Af3irm San Diego in collaboration with The Centro Cultural de la Raza will be presenting the film MAQUILAPOLIS [city of factories] by Vicky Funari and Sergio De La Torre. Following the film is a panel discussion with local groups on how to continue the efforts against Free Trade Agreements (old and new) in our bordering communities. 

    Friday August 24th, 6pm

    2004 Park Blvd., San Diego, California 92101
     
    About the film 

    “To create MAQUILAPOLIS, the filmmakers brought together factory workers in Tijuana and community organiza

    tions in Mexico and the U.S. to collaborate on a film that depicts globalization through the eyes of the women who live on its leading edge. The factory workers who appear in the film have been involved in every stage of production, from planning to shooting, from scripting to outreach. This collaborative process breaks with the traditional documentary practice of dropping into a location, shooting and leaving with the “goods,” which would only repeat the pattern of the maquiladora itself. The process embraces subjectivity as a value and a goal. It merges artmaking with community development to ensure that the film’s voice will be truly that of its subjects.”

    http://www.facebook.com/events/190207297776903/

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    San Diego Stop TPP Media Hits

    Posted August 15th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    Pacific Rim Trade Zone Talks Begin in SD: Opponents Peacefully Protest Proposed Trade Deal that Would Send Jobs to Low-Wage Countries

    “This not only contributes to the nation’s severe unemployment problems, but it pushes down wages and benefits for the jobs we have left,” said Lorena Gonzalez, chief executive officer of the San Diego and Imperial Counties Labor Council. “That means a smaller tax base to support our schools, our infrastructure, and other critical services.”

     

    Opponents Protest Trans-Pacific Free Trade Zone Talks

    Opponents say the proposed trade deal would send jobs to low-wage countries, attack environmental and consumer safety standards, and expand the deregulation of banks, hedge funds and insurance companies, among other things.

     

    AP: Pacific Rim Trade Talks Open in San Diego

    Some negotiators “are lapdogs for the big corporations,” Ernest Verano, 49, an employee of a San Diego pharmaceutical company whose table displayed a handwritten sign criticizing the North American Free Trade Agreement.

     

    Free Trade Negotiations Sneak Up on San Diego

    San Diego Congressman Bob Filner has expressed dismay that the negotiations are not more public and noted that he voted against the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA.

     

    Trans-Pacific Trade Zone Protest

    A coalition of groups affiliated with the Occupy San Diego movement and organized labor say they will protest outside the hotel and a “Fair Trade Not Free Trade” rally led by the San Diego and Imperial County Labor Council will begin at noon in an adjacent park.

     

    Occupy, Internet Freedom Groups Join Protests against “NAFTA of the Pacific”

    “The administration has done everything it can to keep this under wraps, and we see that as a recipe for a bad deal,” he told In These Times.  ”We’re calling for the TPP to come out of the shadows.”

     

    Pacific Trade Talks Come to San Diego

    “We’re not opposed to trade but we want it to be fair trade,” she said. “Our goal should be that the regulations that are put into trade agreements should bring the rest of the world up and not down.”

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    The TPP Song!

    Posted August 15th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink


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    Dallas Protestors Give USTR ‘Corporate Power Tool Award’; Replace Toilet Paper In Hotel With TPP-TP

    Posted August 15th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    Written by Mike Masnick on TechDirt

    Ron Kirk may believe that he’s getting away with something in negotiating the TPP agreement without the public knowing what he’s doing, but sooner or later he has to realize that the public isn’t going to take it. With the recent TPP negotiations in Dallas, there was (of course) a corporate-sponsored “welcome gala.” However, it appears that some protestors infiltrated the event and were able to announce that the USTR Ron Kirk and the other US negotiators had won the 2012 Corporate Power Tool Award. A protestor by the name of David Goodwin commandeered the microphone at the event and announced that he was Git Haversall, of the “Texas Corporate Power Partnership”, and was giving the award to Ron Kirk because “The TPP agreement is shaping up to be a fantastic way for us to maximize profits, regardless of what the public of this nation—or any other nation—thinks is right.”

    Git-TPP-award
    The protestors actually came very close to giving the plaque to Kirk himself, but security got in the way at the last second. Somewhere around that point, a bunch of protestors apparently started dancing around and chanting “TPP! TPP! TPP!” You can see much of this in the video below:

    Apparently the protestors also successfully replaced much of the toilet paper in the public bathrooms in the hotel with special TP-TPP:

    TP-TPP
    I’m generally of mixed opinions on these kinds of protests. However, seeing as we’re dealing with Ron Kirk, who seems to go out of his way to avoid the public concerning TPP and only listen to corporate interests, any method of making it clear to him that the public is unhappy seems worthwhile.

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    San Diego Rally and March Videos

    Posted August 15th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

     

     

     

     

     

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    San Diego Pots and Pans March Photos 1, Saturday, July 7th

    Posted August 15th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink
     
     
     
     

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    OccupYrCorner, SD: StopTPP

    Posted August 15th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    From the OccupYrCorner Blog, dated July 15th, 2012:

    All of June the members of OYC were busy working with The Coalition to Stop TPP on a week-long awareness event in July in San Diego to highlight and expose the dangers and recklessness of this latest “Free Trade” agreement the Corporations have cooked up.

    Starting the week out with a major march rally outside of the Hilton where the talks were being held, OYC, OSD, various local groups and Unions took part in letting the delegates know: The People Are Here!

    Then, all week, OYC were at the Hilton at noon each day holding signs, banners, having conversations, and handing out flyers to the delegates and passer-by about the weeklong events the Coalition planned: Teach-ins, Street Theater, Actions, and the big March!

    Jun Haro, a video reporter from Japan, decided to follow us around and make us the focus of his report as we made a presence at the HIlton and took our Sidewalk March into the Gaslamp. He interviewed us all, as well as the people we talked with on the way… he couldn’t believe no one knew what TPP was!

    Here’s the video he created! OYC How-To-Video?

    We marched through the Gaslamp informing interested folks: making the diagonal corners of 5th and Island as well as the busy corner of 4th and Broadway our fave spots to get the info out.

    Occupy!

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    OCCUPY THE TPP: STOP THE GLOBAL CORPORATE COUP!

    Posted August 9th, 2012 by andrea • permalink

    Join us for our next call:

    OCCUPY THE TPP: STOP THE GLOBAL CORPORATE COUP!

    AUGUST 20 @ 9p ET

    Visit our Hub to Register for the call.

    HOST: October2011.org

    FOR WHOM: Anyone who is interested in learning more about the TransPacific Partnership – a new trade agreement being negotiated in secret with 600 corporate advisers which will redefine the terms of globalization in a way that gives corporations greater power than national governments. This agreement is very broad in scope affecting internet privacy, access to medicine and more. We will also discuss the upcoming mobilization for the next round of negotiations this September in Northern Virginia.

    PURPOSE: This call is both educational and a call to action.

    MATERIALS FOR THE CALL:

    http://www.citizenstrade.org/ctc/

    http://www.citizen.org/trade/

    http://interoccupy.net/stoptpp/

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    Register to Help Drag the TPP Out of the Shadows

    Posted August 8th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    NO BACK-ROOM DEALS FOR THE 1%!   Help Drag the TPP Out of the Shadows REGISTRATION DEADLINE:  Wednesday, August 15 Trade negotiators and corporate lobbyists from the United States and…

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    Occupy Dallas Spreads News On Secret Trade Deal (Trans-Pacific Partnership)

    Posted July 28th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink



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    Anti-TPP Dance: Public Citizen, CodePINK, Occupy Dallas @ Dallas, Texas

    Posted July 21st, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    Public Citizen, CodePINK, and Occupy Dallas joined forces for a dance to raise awareness for the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) talks at a Dallas mall on Thursday, May 17, 2012. The next round of the secret TPP negotiations will be held in San Diego, California, from July 2-10, 2012. For more information on the TPP, visit http://www.tpp2012.com.



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    Occupy Dallas Crashes Trans-Pacific Partnership Reception

    Posted July 20th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink



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    Ben & Jerry Join Local and National Groups Calling for a Fair Deal on Trans-Pacific Trade

    Posted July 17th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    Ice Cream Makers Help Coalition Deliver Over 10,000 Postcards to Trade Negotiators Currently Meeting in Chicago

    CHICAGO, IL – September 6 – As a major Pacific Rim trade summit begins in downtown Chicago aimed at concluding a massive new international trade pact, iconic ice cream makers Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield joined fair trade advocates from the labor, environmental, family farm, public health and consumer movements today to deliver over 10,000 hand-signed postcards urging the U.S. Trade Representative to ensure any deal advances labor, environmental and human rights standards at home and abroad.

    “The trade negotiations beginning today could have a significant impact on the economy, the environment, public health and consumer safety in Chicago and beyond,” said Arthur Stamoulis, executive director of Citizens Trade Campaign.  “Civil society organizations from around the country and the world, including civic-minded businesses like Ben & Jerry’s, are in town urging negotiators to put human needs rather than corporate profits at the center of any new pact.”

    “We started a company which is learning to make fair and just decisions that take people into account.  We need international trade agreements that do the same and help to improve living standards at home and abroad,” said Ben Cohen, co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s.  “People in Chicago, the United States and throughout the world deserve a fair deal.”

    Trade negotiators from nine Pacific Rim countries are meeting at the Hilton Chicago from September 6 – 15 to try to complete a new Trans-Pacific Free Trade Agreement.  The pact is poised to become the largest regional trade agreement of its type ever for the United States, and is likely to have significant impacts on the economy, environment and national sovereignty.

    The postcard delivery comes a day after a rally in Grant Park where protesters demanded a “fair deal or no deal.”  At issue is whether this first trade pact negotiated by the Obama administration will implement the President’s campaign commitments to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) model of trade pacts that has cost the U.S. manufacturing jobs and flooded the country with unsafe imports. The postcards delivered call on negotiators to insist that the Trans-Pacific trade deal include:

    • Strong, clear and enforceable labor standards base on International Labor Organization conventions
    • An end to investor-to-state provisions that threaten environmental and consumer protections
    • A clear mandate enabling countries to obtain affordable, generic medications for sick people
    • Respect for communities’ decisions as to how to best support family farmers and feed their populations

    Ben & Jerry’s helped collect thousands of postcard signatures at concerts and other events throughout the month of August.  Other postcards were collected by fair trade advocates at a Labor Day rally in Chicago’s Grant Park on Monday, and at other events throughout the country.

    “Just like there’s more than one way to do business, there’s more than one way to do trade policy.  We encourage trade negotiators to create an agreement that works for working people, farmers and the environment in all countries,” said Jerry Greenfield, co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s.

    “These talks are a big deal because they will decide if this is another damaging NAFTA with the same ban on Buy America, incentives to offshore jobs and limits on import safety that large corporations want but significant majorities of American across the political spectrum oppose or a new fair trade deal,” said Lori Wallach, director of Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. “The U.S. already has trade deals with countries representing 80% of this group’s total GNP, so unless this first Obama trade deal actually fixes the old ones as Obama promised as a candidate, we are talking about the damage of NAFTA with Vietnam and Malaysia and no upside.”

    “This is about life and death. Trade agreements need to affirm nations’ rights to provide life-saving, generic medications to people living with AIDS and other diseases,” said Akudo Ejelonu, national field organizer for HealthGAP. “Instead, the U.S. acting as the mouthpiece for multinational pharmaceutical companies, demanding countries like Vietnam, Malaysia, Chile and Peru agree to policies that would cut off access to affordable medicines for millions.”

    “Chicago and the nation cannot afford another trade agreement that offshores manufacturing and service sector jobs, reduces the tax base and puts a downward pressure on the wages and benefits in the jobs that are left,” said Alex Han of Stand Up! Chicago.  ”We hope negotiators are ready to learn from the damage wrought by past trade deals.  Otherwise, they may as well go home now.”

    “Trade negotiators need to recognize that family farmers and big corporate agribusiness have very different interests.  A fair trade agreement would serve farmers by respecting communities’ right to food sovereignty, fair prices and protecting against unsafe imports.  Corporate traders export, not family farmers,” said Ben Burkett, Mississippi farmer and president of the National Family Farm Coalition.

    “This agreement, and its investment chapter in particular, must not be based on the NAFTA model,” said Bill Waren of Friends of the Earth.  “Big oil, mining multinationals and giant agri-business are demanding NAFTA-style investment provisions. They don’t want to be held accountable by legislatures or courts for the environmental destruction and social injustice wrought by their investment projects around the Pacific Rim.  No NAFTA for the Pacific.”

    ###

    The Citizens Trade Campaign (CTC) is a national coalition of environmental, labor, consumer, family farm, religious, and other civil society groups founded in 1992 to improve the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). We are united in a common belief that international trade and investment are not ends unto themselves, but instead must be viewed as a means for achieving other societal goals such as economic justice, human rights, healthy communities, and a sound environment.

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    Trans-Pacific Partnership picketed by Occupy Dallas – Addison

    Posted July 17th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    On May 12th, Activist groups join Occupy Dallas in a rally and march demanding transparency and an end to corporate trade deals that hurt workers during a major international summit on trade and investment in Addison.

    A major international summit on trade and investment was held in Addison, near Dallas, and numerous activist groups joined Occupy Dallas in a rally and march demanding transparency and an end to corporate trade deals that hurt working people. The activist are asking for good jobs, affordable medicine and a healthy environment.The TPP is an international trade and investment pact between the United States and countries throughout the Pacific Rim and are being negotiated behind closed doors.

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    Media Coverage of San Diego TPP Negotiations

    Posted July 10th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    San Diego News City News Service: Pacific Rim Trade Zone Talks Begin in SD: Opponents Peacefully Protest Proposed Trade Deal that Would Send Jobs to Low-Wage Countries (Published in multiple…

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    San Diego and the Nation Greet TPP Negotiators

    Posted July 9th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    As trade negotiators and corporate lobbyists met at a swank San Diego hotel this July in an attempt to push the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) toward conclusion, labor, environmental and community organizations…

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    Photos from the San Diego TPP Round

    Posted July 4th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    Below are photos and updates from week of action surrounding the 13th Round of Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations, held at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel in July 2012. The…

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    San Diego Fair Trade Not Free Trade Rally, July 2nd, Pics and Video

    Posted July 3rd, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    The Fair Trade Not Free Trade Rally against the TPP talks happening in San Diego kicked off a week of actions and conferences to bring attention to and inform the public about the secret meetings that effect everyone’s future. Many thanks to all of the Labor Unions, Community Organizations, and Occupy groups that were instrumental in this well-attended rally.

    by Doug Porter

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    Press Release

    Posted June 30th, 2012 by osdnotpp • permalink

    PRESS RELEASE

    Contacts:
    Will Johnson, Occupy San Diego: 707-225-4605; willj@sandiegooccupy.org
    Kristen Smith, Women Occupy San Diego: 352-278-2123; kristensmith64@yahoo.com

     
    Coalition to STOP TPP Announces Week of Protest
    and an International Community-Based Conference

    No to NAFTA on Steroids

    From June 30 to July 8, the secret, super-treaty negotiations known as the 13th Round of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Negotiations  are being held here in San Diego at the Hilton Bayfront Hotel. The Coalition to STOP TPP hereby announces a week with rallies, a march, various other protests, and a week-long international community-based People’s Conference: A Better World Is Possible!

    The 11 nations involved in the talks are the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Malaysia, Vietnam, Brunei, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and Canada. Japan has indicated a desire to join. The economic power of this group is more than 40% larger than the 27-nation European Union. The claimed purpose of TPP is to promote development and create jobs. But their reality is different. Though the contents of these negotiations are secret, what is not a secret is that the impacts of the TPP on these Pacific Rim nations, on peasants, on farmers, on workers, on their natural resources, on the environment, will be devastating. Some people describe the TPP as “NAFTA on Steroids.”

     The TPP will:

    • Offshore good-paying jobs to low-wage nations and undercut working conditions globally
    • Create new tools for attacking environmental and consumer safety standards
    • Expand the deregulation of banks, hedge funds and insurance companies
    • Further concentrate control of global food supplies, displacing family farmers and peasants and subjecting consumers
    to wild price fluctuations and un-labeled genetically-modified food
    • Undermine public health policies that reduce tobacco consumption and increase access to medicine
    • Give multinational corporations and private investors the right to sue nations in private tribunals. These tribunals have the power to overturn environmental, labor, or any other laws that limit profit, and award the corporations taxpayer-funded damages.
    • Encourage privatization of lands and natural resources in areas where indigenous people live

    During the week of July 2-7, the Coalition to STOP TPP will hold the following events:

     • July 2, Monday, 12 pm – Support the Fair Trade Not Free Trade Rally sponsored by the San Diego and Imperial County Labor Council, in the park adjacent to the Hilton Bayfront Hotel

    • July 7, Saturday, 11 am – March with Pots and Pans Against TPP! March leaves Civic Center at 11 am

    • July 2, 3, 5, 6 & 7 – Conduct a People’s Conference: A Better World Is Possible!
    Schedule of Panels and Panelists: http://stoptpp.org/2012/06/29/peoples-conference-list-of-guests-4/

     We are protesting because the TPP must be stopped. We are holding our international conference in different venues in various San Diego communities so that we can share our experience and understanding of such disasters as NAFTA. But also we want to learn from each other about how we can build a better world – a world which is diametrically opposed to the practice of the multinational corporations and investor banks which are negotiating in secret to restructure the economies of the Pacific Rim nations to suit their profit-hungry goals. We will discuss in the conference, based on our varied, diverse and multicultural experiences how to build a better world based on: sustainable, networked, local economies; on full democratic participation: on cooperative and supportive human relations.

    The Coalition to STOP TPP and its endorsers include: Occupy San Diego, Occupy City Heights, OccupYrCorner,
    Women Occupy San Diego, OSD Labor Solidarity Committee, San Diego Coalition for Peace and Justice, Global Trade Watch – Public Citizen, International Socialist Organization – San Diego, Canvass for a Cause, In Motion Magazine, Occupy Santa Rosa, Bayan USA, International League of Peoples’ Struggle, Occupy Los Angeles, Colectivo Zapatista, Green Party of San Diego County, People for Social Sustainability, Activist San Diego, Freedom Road Socialist Organization and KNSJ.org

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    People’s Conference – List of Guests

    Posted June 29th, 2012 by osdnotpp • permalink

    Monday July 2nd * 6:30 – *8:30pm 567 South 28th Street, San Diego, California 92113
    Workers’ Rights, Outsourcing, Wal-Mart & Gentrification

    • Benjamin Prado – Member of Union del Barrio, San Diego
    • Celeste Drake – AFL-CIO
    • Genoveva Aguilar – Proyecto de Casas Saludables
    • Christian Ramírez – The director of the Southern Border Communities Coalition.
    • Colectivo Zapatista
    • Petra Mata – La Fuerza Unida
    • Viola Casares – La Fuerza Unida

    Tuesday, July 3rd * 6:00 – 9:00pm 2004 Park Blvd., San Diego, California 92101
    IP, GMOs & Healthcare AND Women & the TPP

    • Francisco Vera – Vice President of the ONG Derechos Digitales (aka The Digital Rights NGO) in Santiago, Chile.
    • Kevin J. Green – Professor of Law at Thomas Jefferson School of Law.
    • Maira Sutton – Maira Sutton is the International Intellectual Property Coordinator at the Electronic
    • Frontier Foundation (EFF).
    • Sanya Reid Smith – Legal Advisor & Senior Researcher, Third World Network, Penang, Malaysia.
    • Cathy Mendonça – Cathy Mendonca is a Residential Advocate at the YWCA of San Diego’s Becky’s House and is the newest member of Af3rm San Diego.
    • Kathy Sorrel – Occupy San Diego
    • Petra Mata – La Fuerza Unida
    • Viola Casares – La Fuerza Unida

    Thursday, July 5th * 6:00 – 9:00pm 2004 Park Blvd., San Diego, California 92101
    Geopolitics & Empire AND Indigenous Rights

    • Arnie Saiki – Coordinator of Moana Nui : The Pacific Peoples, their Lands and Economies, a three-day summit in November 2011 in Honolulu. Coordinator of Imipono Projects.
    • Dave Gapp – Lieutenat Colonel Rtd. U.S. Air Force. Member of Veterans for Peace
    • Herb Shore – Retired professor from San Diego state University. He will speak on : the Tijuana-San Diego Region, globalization, NAFTA and cross-border solidarity.
    • Kuusela Hilo – ILPS-US Chapter Country Co-Coordinator and member of the International Coordinating Committee of the ILPS.
    • Victor Menotti – Executive Director of Internatinal Forum on Globalization
    • Gustavo Esteva – A founder of the Universidad de la Tierra in Oaxaca, Mexico. He is also a former corporate executive, a former guerrilla, a former high-ranking official in the government of President Echeverría, and an advisor with the Zapatista Army for National Liberation (EZLN) in Chiapas for the negotiations with the government.
    • Mahina Rapu – An elder from Rapa nui (Easter Island), health practioner and independent activist
    • Steve Newcomb – Shawnee/Lenape, author of “Pagans in the Promised Land: Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery.”
    • Stan Rodriguez – Kumeyaay Community College
    • Manlio Cesar Correa – Director of the Instituto Binacional de la Fronteras.
    • Paul O’Toko – Executive Director, Indigenous Stewards International
    • Theresa Jaranilla – Theresa Jaranilla is the Southwest Coordinator for BAYAN-USA, an alliance of progressive Filipino groups in the U.S.

    Thursday, July 5th * 6:00 – 9:00pm
    Local Economies & Sustainability AND Biodiversity & Climate Change

    • Andrea Carter – Attorney from San Diego and member of the Ant Hill Collective an egalitarian housing community.
    • Esteban del Río – Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of San Diego.
    • Jane Kelsey – Professor of law at the University of Auckland, in New Zealand, and a prominent critic of globalization. She is a key member of the Action Resource Education Network of Aotearoa (Arena). She is also actively involved in campaigning for the New Zealand Government’s full recognition of the Treaty of Waitangi.
    • Jeeni Criscenzo – Executive Director of Amikas. She will speak on Common Credits.
    • Dr. Murtaza Baxamusa – Director of Planning and Development for the Family Housing Corporation of the San Diego County Building and Construction Trades Council, as well an Adjunct Faculty with the Sol Price School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California.
    • Ben Burkett –President of the National Family Farm Coalition (NFFC) in the U.S., and a cooperative-marketing-specialist member of the Federation of Southern Cooperatives Land Assistance Fund. Former Indian Springs, current director of the Mississippi Association of Cooperatives, the local arm of The Federation of Southern Cooperatives. Ben represents NFFC on the Via Campesina Food Sovereignty C omission and is a board member of the Community Food Security Coalition (CFSC).
    • Holly Hellerstedt – Field Director, Canvass for a Cause, Board member Calirifrnia Student Sustainability Coalition
    • Ilana Solomon – National trade representative for the Sierra Club.
    • Lori Wallach – Lori Wallach is Director of Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch division.

    Friday, July 6 * 6:30pm – 8:30pm
    Food Freedom or NAFTA on Steroids?

    • Ben Burkett, President of the National Family Farm Coalition
    • plus more

    Saturday, July 7 * 3:00 – 5:00pm
    Fukushima & Nuclear Power

    • Ms. Chieko Shiina – experienced activist and dedicated organic farmer in Kawamata village of Fukushima before March 11th, 2001. One of her major contributions to Japan’s national anti-nukes organizing is that she organized the sit-in in front of the Ministry of Economy and Industry from September 11th, 2011. Further, she organized 100 women from Fukushima to set up “Women’s 10 months and 10 days sit-in” from late October, which later became both a symbolic and physical space where women from all over Japan came to communicate and organize. Co-sponsored with San Diego Veterans for Peace.

    Plus more tba

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    Noam Chomsky to OSD on FTAs

    Posted June 22nd, 2012 by osdnotpp • permalink

         The words “free trade agreement” should bring to mind the response attributed to Gandhi when he was asked what he thought about western civilization: “it might be a good idea.” Same with “free trade agreements.” Maybe they would be a good idea, maybe not, but the question scarcely arises in the real world. What are called “free trade agreements” have only a limited relation to free trade, or even trade at all, and are certainly not agreements, at least if the people of a country are regarded as its citizens.

    The FTAs are investor rights agreements, negotiated mostly in secret by representatives of transnational corporations and the few powerful states that cater to their interests. The public is largely excluded, and often opposed. The agreements include highly protectionist elements, such as the monopoly pricing rights that impose enormous costs on consumers and have no legitimate justification. They interpret “trade” to include actions internal to command economies, as when a giant corporation produces parts in Indiana, ships them to a subsidiary in Mexico for assembly, then sells the product in California, with each border crossing called “trade” — a very large component of world “trade.”

    We did not call it “trade” when parts were produced in Leningrad, assembled in Poland, and sold in Moscow, all within the Soviet command economy. The concept of “trade” is further illuminated by events taking place right now. The World Bank has just ruled that the Canadian mining corporation Pacific Rim can proceed with its case against El Salvador for trying to preserve lands and communities from highly destructive gold mining. Under the investor rights agreements, the crime of imposing environmental constraints can be punished on the grounds that it harms potential profits.

    Predatory corporations must be guaranteed the right to destroy for profit, whatever the human cost. That is only a tiny sample of what is called “trade,” a category designed, not surprisingly, to enhance the power and privilege of the designers. The public should be concerned, informed, and engaged.”

    Noam Chomsky (Contribution to Occupy San Diego on Free Trade Agreements when approached to being part of OSD Free Education Collective Counter-TPP Conference)

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    What Is The TPP? Video

    Posted June 20th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

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    Fair trade! not free trade!

    Posted June 19th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    Fair trade! Not free trade!

    Join Labor and community groups for a kick–off press conference/ Protest Rally 

    Monday July 2nd - 12 pm 

    Park adjacent to Hilton Bayfront and Convention Center 

    Trans Pacific Trade Agreement (TPP) is a massive trade agreement That will offshore American jobs, Attack Environment and consumer safety policies, and deregulate Wall street banks, hedge Funds, and Insurance companies. Representatives from corporations and other countries will be negotiat-ing the tpp behind-closed-doors in san Diego at the Hilton Bayfront from July 2nd to July 10th.

     Time to say NO MORE to behind-closed-door deals! 

    For more information contact Sandy Naranjo 619-228-8101 ext. 6 or snaranjo@unionyes.org

    Download the Flyer

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    San Diego and the Nation Prepare to Greet the TPP

    Posted June 19th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    People from southern California and throughout the nation are preparing to greet trade negotiators and corporate lobbyists as they gather for the 13th major round of Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations…

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    No Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement, Action Meeting Los Angeles, Koreatown’s Immigrant Workers Alliance

    Posted June 18th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    The 13th round of negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) will be held in San Diego, CA July 2-10th. Often referred to as the “NAFTA of the Pacific,” the TPP is what Obama describes as a “landmark, 21st Century Trade Agreement” that improves on and rectifies past problems in U.S. trade and investment treaties. If concluded, the TPP will be the largest free-trade agreement ever. Nine countries are currently negotiating the TPP: the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Peru, Brunei, Vietnam, Malaysia, and Singapore. Despite large protests at home against accession into the TPP, Japan, Canada, and Mexico have also expressed interest in joining. Although the negotiations are being held in secret, leaked documents confirm that contrary to democratic practice, the documents connected to the negotiations will remain secret for four years after being signed or dismissed.

    The United States is leading the negotiations and has a great deal of influence over the outcome of the agreement, which covers a vast range of subject matters. Chapters include the tariffs on goods, trade in services, access to medicines, intellectual property, energy, labor, environmental, many sectors that will have a direct negative impact on consumers, labor and environmental resources– not just in the U.S.– but the cooperating countries and small economies around the Pacific.

    As Pacific Islands continue to be dominated by the large economies of Australia, New Zealand, Chile, France, Indonesia and the U.S. these large economies have been exploiting many small Pacific island resources for their own economic gain for generations, and as it will be the smallest economies that are hit the hardest, we invite Pacific islanders to stand in protest of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. NAFTA policies have crippled many Mexican local farmers and family industries and created conditions of both poverty and violence.

    NAFTA coupled with US subsidies to agri-business gives them an unfair advantage that has driven an increasing number of campesinos to migrate to the cities or risk their lives en-route to El Norte. Large corporate financial, GMO, and Pesticide product firms like Monsanto and Cargill have bullied small farmers by using their financial advantage in courts to harass farmers for insidious trademark infringement to bankrupt small farms. Mexico is lining up with Japan and Canada and we ask that the Latino/Chicano activists stand in solidarity to prevent this ”NAFTA on steroids.”

    One of the most egregious chapters is what is technically called “investor-state rights,” which allows for corporations to sue governments in third-party courts. When governments are sued, it is the taxpayers who are liable and the people who are most affected. Investor-state dispute settlements can be described as the 1% suing the 99% in foreign non-juried courts, since the TPP consolidates corporate power by giving rights to the 1%, investor stakeholders. Indigenous peoples will be most impacted by the TPP, as a result of further deregulations of federal environmental protections. Because these trade agreements are internationally binding in what can be referred to as supra-national investor agreements that take place between nations or economies (as within APEC), resource exploitation by transnational corporations are not bound by the same regulatory framework as “local” investments. This means, for example, that transnational mining companies, funded by the large international banks, will be able to dispute federal environmental regulations in third party foreign courts. Hypothetically, if investors have greater rights to sue governments in international courts, then it stands to reason, that investments that are negotiated between corporations and governments-to-governments could find themselves drowning in international legal fees and paying damages for loss of profits resulting from environmental regulations. In the WTO, international courts often rule in favor of the rights of investors.

    Already in Japan, New Zealand and Australia, activists have successfully drawn attention to the disadvantages of the TPP. Here in Southern California, we have the largest representation of diversity among Latinos, Asians, indigenous peoples and Pacific Islanders, communities that will be hit the hardest by the TPP.

    Koreatown’s Immigrant Workers Alliance

    3465 West 8th

    St. (nr. Hobart, east of Western)

    Los Angeles, CA 90005

    Download the PDF

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    National Days of Action on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

    Posted June 13th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    Photos from the TPP National Days of Action (July 2012) Augusta, Maine Austin, Tex. Beaver, Penn. Escondido, Calif. Hopkins, Minn. Johnstown, Penn. New York City, N.Y. Portland, Ore.  (photo by…

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    OSD Free Education Collective Discussion – June 16th

    Posted June 13th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    OSD Free Education Collective invites you to a discussion titled “How the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) puts the interests of multinational corporations above those of working people, the environment, and the sovereignty of national governments” on Saturday June 16, 2012 from 12:30pm to 2:00pm.
    Two members of the OSD Free Education Collective will introduce and facilitate this discussion before the OSD General Assembly about the TPP, focused on the NEWLY LEAKED Investor provisions chapter of the TPP that seeks to further privilege foreign investors ahead of working people, the environment, and the sovereignty of national governments.

    Suggested reading:
    http://www.citizenstrade.org/ctc/blog/2012/06/13/newly-leaked-tpp-investment-chapter-contains-special-rights-for-corporations/
    http://www.citizenstrade.org/ctc/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/gtwtppinvestmentanalysis.pdf
    http://www.citizenstrade.org/ctc/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/tppinvestment.pdf

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    Wide Coalition Planning Meeting on Friday, June 15th

    Posted June 13th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    Join us at 6:30pm at the Peace Resource Center (we originally planned to meet at Kakatoa) but due to growing interest on this topic and our collaboration with Peace and Justice Coalition we will have the meeting here. Join us!!!

    3850 Westgate Place  San Diego, CA 92105

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    Want to meet with a secret international TPP negotiator?

    Posted June 13th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    July 2 will be the first day of the TPP Stakeholder meeting. The general public (us) are able to register for free to this event. By registering we are going to be able to attend the meeting, talk to stakeholders, have an Occupy table, and be there as a part of the meeting. We encourage people to register ASAP. They need to hear from the people. Us people. People concerned about human dignity more than “investor”/exploiter profits.

    Registration is for July 2 at the Hilton Bayfront Hotel.  It’s FREE, and the deadline is this Thursday at midnight.

    https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07e5yh3yt0c168d0a9&oseq=

    For organization use concerned citizen.

    Thanks, and register!!!

    Read the Invitation for Registration from OSD

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    Newly Leaked TPP Investment Chapter Contains Special Rights for Corporations

    Posted June 13th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    A leaked draft of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) investment chapter has been published online by Citizens Trade Campaign, the same coalition that first published TPP proposals from the United States…

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    Thanks!

    Posted June 10th, 2012 by stopptpp • permalink

    Many thanks to the overwhelming support we have already received in making this series of events happen from area groups and organizations. We are particularly thankful for our official endorsements from the General Assemblies of Occupy San Diego, Occupy City Heights, and OccupYrCorner and look forward to sharing more endorsements and associations in the future.

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    Talking Points on the Need for Transparency in the TPP

    Posted June 6th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

     * The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is poised to become the largest free trade agreement ever.  Current negotiating countries include the United States, Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and…

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    Texans Demand Transparency in Secretive TPP Trade Talks

    Posted May 15th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    As trade negotiators from throughout the Pacific Rim gathered outside Dallas for a trade summit aimed at speeding the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Free Trade Agreement towards conclusion, Texans were…

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    Photos from Trans-Pacific FTA Actions in Southern California

    Posted February 2nd, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    San Diego Rally against a Free Trade Ring of Fire As negotiators met at University of California San Diego campus on February 3, 2012, labor, immigrant rights and student activists…

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    Exposing the Trans-Pacific FTA in Southern California

    Posted January 25th, 2012 by CTC • permalink

    Trade negotiators from throughout the Pacific Rim are meeting in posh Beverly Hills and La Jolla, California to hammer out the details on the largest Free Trade Agreement that the…

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    Leaked Trans-Pacific FTA Texts Reveal U.S. Undermining Access to Medicine

    Posted October 22nd, 2011 by CTC • permalink

    Leaked Trans-Pacific Free Trade Agreement Texts Reveal U.S. Pushing Extreme Pharmaceutical Corporation Demands that Would Undermine Consumers’ Access to Affordable Medicine Obama Administration Positions Roll Back Initial 2007 Reforms Made…

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    Statement and Analysis: Leaked US Proposal for a TPP Pharmaceutical Chapter

    Posted October 22nd, 2011 by CTC • permalink

    Statement and Analysis: Leaked US Proposal for a TPP Pharmaceutical Chapter By Sean Flynn October 22, 2011 STATEMENT All countries negotiating the Trans Pacific Partnership agreement should reject the US…

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    Congress Passes Job-Killing Trade Deals

    Posted October 21st, 2011 by CTC • permalink

    Despite overwhelming opposition by a wide range of labor, environmental, family farm, consumer, faith and human rights organizations in the United States and abroad, Congress passed the Korea, Panama and…

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    Photos from the Chicago Week of Action on Trans-Pacific Trade

    Posted September 12th, 2011 by CTC • permalink

    As a major international trade summit took place in downtown Chicago in September 2011, trade justice activists from the labor, environmental, public health, family farm and consumer movements gathered to…

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    Statement on Trade Policy in the President’s Jobs Speech

    Posted September 9th, 2011 by CTC • permalink

    For Immediate Release September 8, 2011 Statement on Trade Policy in the President’s Jobs Speech by Arthur Stamoulis, Executive Director, Citizens Trade Campaign The President’s job speech contained many laudable…

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    Chicago Week of Action on the Trans-Pacific Free Trade Agreement

    Posted September 1st, 2011 by CTC • permalink

    As a major international trade summit begins in downtown Chicago, trade justice activists from the labor, environmental, public health, family farm and consumer movements will be demanding a Fair Deal or…

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    Ben & Jerry Join Groups Calling for a Fair Deal on Trans-Pacific Trade

    Posted September 1st, 2011 by CTC • permalink

    Press Event and Rally Delivering Over 10,000 Postcards to Trade Negotiators Tuesday, September 6 * 11:00 am Outside the Hilton Chicago Downtown S. Michigan Ave & Balbo Ave As a major…

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    Chicago Labor Day Rally for Fair Trade

    Posted September 1st, 2011 by CTC • permalink

    Say No to a New NAFTA — A Fair Deal or No Deal! LABOR DAY RALLY FOR JOBS, AFFORDABLE MEDICINE AND A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT September 5, 2011 11:00 am to…

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